So I like forensic pathology shows and movies. I started watching CHiPs when I was 8 or 9 but then discovered Hawaii 5-0. It was on much later but had bloody murder in it! At the time however, I did not dare watch Quincy because I thought I would pass out like the guy in the opening credits. Those shows may not have been appropriate for tweens but they were light fare compared to today’s gore and sex fest television. I grew up in an insular French-Canadian community (Beauport, Qu├ębec) watching US tv shows made for adults. I had access to knowledge and ideas that would only filter down to my community 2-3 years later if ever. It would be “impossible” for a teenage girl in the early 80’s to be well-read (TIMES magazine), informed (20/20) and smart so I had to endure the stigma of being weird all my adolescence. To some degree I still do because I have candor on life and can discuss most anything without getting overly emotional about it like crime and criminals.

So back to the cop shows, an enduring obsession for decades… The whole idea of reverse engineering a violent crime based on the scene is really fascinating to me especially when there is nobody to tell the tale. I watch CSI (the original) and miss the days when the writers had a dart board of perversions in their office and would randomly select a kink to fabricate a gory murder scenario (okay I only SUSPECT that’s how they managed the first 4-5 year’s plots.) I can’t say I would be good at the science that goes into forensics (especially chemistry and physics) but I always figure out the motives and psychological machinations of the murderer early on in the plot.

In the past month I have found following, documenting and analyzing a very active criminal in Montreal very interesting. After speaking with his little brother who admitted his older sibling was “like that” for about 11 years, I told him that I had testimony of his actions as young as 8 years old… and that kind of surprised him proving that EVERYONE who knows that man is obfuscated by his lies even his mom, dad and little brother. This finally proves my theory that he doesn’t actually exist in the same sense that WE do. In the end when you put his whole story together it becomes somewhat comical, maybe not to his countless past and future victims but to the rest of the world who can see that a life of crime is useless, pathetic and lonely.

In the movie Pathology we follow a rag tag of competitive forensic pathologists who enjoy discussing the perfect murder, amongst other questionable activities. I don’t believe there is such a thing; today anyway. I believe “crime solving professionals” are not as well equipped in time, money and equipment as TV shows make us believe.

I enjoyed this movie because it is mostly set in medical examiner labs (complete with a sea of dead bodies in various stages of examination.) It has long medical terms I’ve never heard before. I find that much more interesting than watching movies that follow flamboyant serial killers with inexplicable pathologies on their pre-meditated killing spree… But don’t think Pathology doesn’t have any of those!

Pathology is a very gory and dark film that leaves me with one question: “Why would a fine doctor like Grey (Ventimiglia) play along?”